Psychology in dating

25-Sep-2017 01:27 by 4 Comments

Psychology in dating

Louise told me that looks were not that important to her, but that a good sense of humor was a must.

According to Li et al., “a necessity is something that is initially extremely desirable…but as more of it is acquired, it diminishes in value. Consider the characteristics that are often considered desirable in a mate—a sense of humor, intelligence, kindness, understanding, a family orientation, good looks. Mate preferences in the US and Singapore: A cross-cultural test of the mate preference priority model. Which would you rank as most important in a romantic partner? Research consistently shows that we rank most or all of these traits as more important than good looks (Apostolou, 2011; Apostolou, 2015; Buss et al., 2001; Perilloux et al., 2011). Personality and Individual Differences, 50(2), 291-294. Physical Attractiveness is Less Important Than We Think One reason we may not consciously realize the importance of physical attractiveness is that we don’t necessarily want partners who are extremely attractive—we just want partners who are attractive . In Dion et al.’s (1972) research, both attractive and moderately attractive individuals were viewed more positively than less attractive counterparts. Sex differences in mate preferences revisited: Do people know what they initially desire in a romantic partner? Matching for attractiveness in romantic partners and same-sex friends: A meta-analysis and theoretical critique. For example, attractive individuals are expected to be happier and to have more rewarding life experiences than unattractive individuals (Dion et al., 1972; Griffin and Langlois, 2006).

This tendency to associate attractiveness with positive qualities occurs crossculturally (Shaffer et al., 2000; Zebrowitz et al., 2012). A luxury, in contrast, is not important when necessities are lacking, but becomes more desirable once basic needs have been met” (p. The research reviewed above suggests that most of us, consciously or not, view a moderate level of physical attractiveness as a “necessity,” while a higher level of may be a “luxury.” When we say that physical attractiveness is not important to us, we are likely referring to the luxury of attractiveness and not the necessity of a minimum level of attractiveness. We don’t need to be supermodels to find a mate, but whom we consider to be “moderately attractive” varies from person to person. More attractive people tend to perceive fewer others as physically attractive while less attractive individuals may consider a broader range of others appealing (Montoya, 2008). Parent-offspring conflict over mating: Testing the tradeoffs hypothesis. Buss, D., Shackelford, T., Kirkpatrick, L., & Larsen, R. A half century of mate preferences: The cultural evolution of values. Similarly, in Griffin and Langlois’ (2006) research, a lack of attractiveness was associated with negative qualities, but only a moderate level of attractiveness was necessary to make one's associations positive. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 94(2), 245–264. To interest us, then, potential mates do not need to be exceptionally attractive, only moderately so. Implicit and explicit preferences for physical attractiveness in a romantic partner: A double dissociation in predictive validity. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34(10), 1315–1331.