Web dating scam

20-Jul-2017 05:38 by 5 Comments

Web dating scam - Dating english newsite com

Other official-looking letters were sent from a writer who said he was a director of the state-owned Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation.He said he wanted to transfer $20 million to the recipient’s bank account – money that was budgeted but never spent.

In exchange for assistance, the scammer promised to share money with the victim in exchange for a small amount of money to bribe prison guards.To help persuade the victim to agree to the deal, the scammer often sends one or more false documents bearing official government stamps, and seals.419 scammers often mention false addresses and use photographs taken from the Internet or from magazines to falsely represent themselves.For example, in 2006, 61% of Internet criminals were traced to locations in the United States, while 16% were traced to the United Kingdom and 6% to locations in Nigeria.One reason Nigeria may have been singled out is the apparently comical, almost ludicrous nature of the promise of West African riches from a Nigerian prince.An email subject line may say something like "From the desk of barrister [Name]", "Your assistance is needed", and so on.

The details vary, but the usual story is that a person, often a government or bank employee, knows of a large amount of unclaimed money or gold which he cannot access directly, usually because he has no right to it.

According to Cormac Herley, a researcher for Microsoft, "By sending an email that repels all but the most gullible, the scammer gets the most promising marks to self-select." In Nigeria, scammers use computers in Internet cafés to send mass emails promising potential victims riches or romance, and to trawl for replies.

They refer to their targets as Magas, slang developed from a Yoruba word meaning "fool".

The scam typically involves promising the victim a significant share of a large sum of money, in return for a small up-front payment, which the fraudster requires in order to obtain the large sum.

If a victim makes the payment, the fraudster either invents a series of further fees for the victim, or simply disappears.

You can do this by hovering over the sender’s name, though some email clients will display the actual address as well.